Education Policy February 3/14: The Record Off The Record: Rugby, Ministry Data, Abandon That Appeal

B. Board Authority Authorized (BAA) Courses: Rugby 10, 11, 12 (pages 20-33 agenda packup)

Recommended motion (Deputy Superintend in a February 3 memo to the Board) : That  the Board of Education approve the following Board Authority Authorized Courses: Rugby 10, 11, 12. / Carried. For: Horsman, Loring-Kuhanga, McEvoy, Nohr, Orcherton   Against: McNally

  • Roberts: Running this course is not dependent on having a Rugby Academy. Would run as an elective, with a mix of Academy and non-Academy students. However, all Academy students are expected to take the course. Availability for students not in  the Academy would be dependent on enrolment numbers sufficient to run it as an elective class.
  • McNally: This District already has 155 BAA courses offered in different locations across the school district. [ If it’s worthwhile to teach a Cancer Institute at one high school, why not at all of them?] Can’t support more fragmentation of public education and more competition for students [and the $6,9000  funding that comes with each student]  between public schools.
SD61 BAA Courses as of 2013 (1)

SD61 BAA Courses as of 2013 (1)

SD61 BAA courses up to 2013 (2)

SD61 BAA courses up to 2013 (2)

SD61 BAA courses up to 2013 (3)

SD61 BAA courses up to 2013 (3)

SD61 BAA courses up to 2013

SD61 BAA courses up to 2013

    • McEvoy: BAA courses are a response to the community. This is what school boards are all about. Should we have one big curriculum that’s the same everywhere? [Possibly. See Finland, often held as an exemplar for public education success.]
    • Loring-Kuhanga: Support BAA courses. But could have two tiers in public schools – this BAA course could have a full section of 30 who can afford the Academy, and those who can’t.
    • Horsman: “Two-tiered” description not appropriate. There is a rugby program in in every school and they can play in intramurals. Those rugby students  wouldn’t see themselves as a “lower tier”. In favour of BAA courses as a matter of principle. It’s a response to community self-identification.

About Diane McNally